Skip to main content

Our Heritage Predates West Virginia

Whether you visit the Farmstead at WVU Jackson’s Mill or experience our History Hitting the Road! outreach program. Our heritage education programs are tailored to affordably meet the needs and educational objectives of each individual group.

Historic Farmstead at WVU Jackson's Mill.
The Historic Farmstead at WVU Jackson's Mill is open to the public..

There’s something for everyone at WVU Jackson's Mill.

Visit us at the Farmstead for educational tours and programs.

Heritage education at WVU Jackson's MillAt WVU Jackson’s Mill, demonstrations can include grist milling, weaving, spinning, basket making, candle dipping, wood working, blacksmithing, paper marbling and other heritage arts that were a part of frontier life. These activities are set against a historic backdrop that features the Old Mill – the only original structure left from Tom Jackson’s day – as well as other authentic 18 th and 19 th century buildings. Tours/programs can run from two (2) hours to all day. The cost ranges from $6 to $8 per person. Lunch can be included (with an additional charge) or you can ‘brown bag’ it. Classes in various heritage arts can also be arranged.

Call 304-406-7023 to learn current hours the Farmstead is open.

History Hitting the Road—Schedule a time for us to come to you.

History Hitting the Road - Paper Marbling

On the road, we work to make the experience just as educational and engaging. For school class programs, the students can be divided into small groups and try their hand at tasks like shelling and grinding corn, dipping candles, weaving, wood working, and paper marbling. They’ll also learn about other aspects of early Appalachian life such as clothing and toys.

Call 304-613-3329 to learn more about History Hitting the Road.

Generations of Jacksons...

Colonel Edward Jackson, a Revolutionary War figure, originally settled the mill on the West Fork River in 1800. Three generations of Jacksons operated mills at this site which boasted saw and grist mills, a carpenter shop, blacksmith forge, quarters for 12 slaves, numerous barns and outbuildings, and a general store on 1500 acres of prime forest and pasture land.

Six year old Thomas Jackson and his four year old sister Laura came here as orphans in 1830 to live with their step-grandmother Elizabeth Jackson and their uncle Cummins Jackson. Thomas lived here until leaving for West Point in 1842.

Tom and Laura remained close throughout their lives until, like so many families, they found themselves on opposite sides of the Civil War. Laura opened her house in Beverly, W.Va., to Union troops as a hospital. Thomas joined the Confederacy and became immortalized at the First Battle of Bull Run as the general the world would know as “Stonewall”.

Cummins Jackson died with no last will and testament. Over the years, the Jackson farmstead was divided and passed through several hands. In 1921, property that included the original Jackson homestead was given to West Virginia University to establish a youth facility. The deed agreement required that the home place marker be maintained. Our historic area has grown from that simple beginning. It has taken a collaborative effort to ensure that this piece of our past is forever remembered.

A Brief History of WVU Jackson’s Mill

Three generations of Jacksons operated mills at this site, originally settled by Col. Edward Jackson prior to 1800. Jackson’s Mill boasted saw and grist mills, a carpenter shop, blacksmith forge, quarters for twelve slaves, numerous barns/outbuildings, and a general store on 1500 acres of prime forest and pasture land.

Over the years, the Jackson farmstead was divided and passed through several hands. In 1921 the remaining property was deeded to the State of West Virginia to be used as a youth camp and entrusted to the Extension Service of West Virginia University. WVU Jackson’s Mill was developed and became the nation’s first state 4-H camp.

Today, all that remains of the original Jackson’s Mill settlement are the grist mill and the Jackson family cemetery. The other structures as well as the slave cemetery have been lost to the ages.

 

Facilities

  • Meeting Rooms
  • Dining
  • Other Facilities

Heritage Programs

  • Historic Farmstead
  • History Hitting the Road

Lodging

  • Suites
  • Lodge Rooms
  • Private Rooms
  • Cottages

Weddings & Receptions

  • Wedding Reception Packages
  • Bronze Package
  • Silver Package
  • Gold Package

W.Va. State Fire Academy

  • Offices & Classrooms
  • Training Arena